Neuruppin Air Base, Germany | Military Airfield Directory

Neuruppin: Air Base

Аэродром Нойруппин

For historical information only, do not use for navigation or aviation purposes!
KoordinatenN525628 E0124713 (WGS84) Google Maps
Former East GermanyDistrict of Potsdam
Federal stateBrandenburg
Map with location of Neuruppin Air Base, Germany
Germany during the Cold War Map
The history of the Cold War airfields: Neuruppin
by Bert Kondruss

During World War II

Usage until 1945

Luftwaffe airbase.

Situation

Neuruppin airfield, Germany, on a map 1943
Neuruppin airfield on a US map from 1943

Overview

Neuruppin air base on a map 1952
Neuruppin air base on a US map from 1952 (Source: AMS M841 GSGS 4414, Courtesy Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University)

During the Cold War

Usage

Soviet airbase until 1991.

In the 1950s

Units

1954

- Soviet fighter regiment (P. O. Box 62 319),
- A total of 30 (?) MiG-15/MiG-15U were counted at the airfield.
Source: BND/Bundesarchiv B 206/3033
(For the P. O. Box numbers the digits 3 and 5 may be confused, because they are difficult to distinguish in the source document)

In the 1960s

Situation

Neuruppin Air Base on a map 1969
Neuruppin Air Base on a US map from 1969 - The Berlin-Rostock autobahn did not exist at this time. (Source: Earth Sciences and Map Library, University of California, Berkeley)

In the 1970s

Situation

Neuruppin Air Base, Germany, on a map 1972
Neuruppin Air Base on a map of the US Department of Defense from 1972 (Source: ONC E-2 (1972), Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection, University of Texas at Austin)

Overview

Neuruppin Air Base, Germany, on a US satellite image 1970
Neuruppin Air Base on a US satellite image from 25 November 1970 (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Runway in the west
Runway in the west (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Aircraft shelter in the north
Aircraft shelter in the north (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Flight line
Flight line (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Shelter area in the norheast
Shelter area in the norheast (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Runway in the east
Runway in the east (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Installations in the southeast
Installations in the southeast (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)
Anti-aircraft missile site
Anti-aircraft missile site, 4.5 km south-southwest of the airfield (Source: U.S. Geological Survey)

Radio communication

Call sign: GIDROSTAT

In the 1980s and early 1990s

Runways

Data for the year 1990:
  • 10/28: 2400 m Concrete

Radio beacons

Data for the year 1990:
  • LOM 28: 842 "WÖ"
  • LMM 28: 412 "W"
  • LOM 10: 842 "GK"
  • LMM 10: 412 "G"

Radio communication

Call sign: CHUTOROK (1990)

Units

1990: 730 IBAP (Su-17M-4, Su-17UM-3); 9 OVE (Mi-6, Mi-8, Mi-9)

History

  • 1988
    Crash of a Neuruppin FITTER in early 1988. The US Military Liaison Mission is able to forward 50 pounds of parts of the aircraft.
    Source: /USMLM 1988/

Images

Pieces of wreckage from a Neuruppin Su-17 FITTER:Pieces of Wreckage  from a Neuruppin Soviet Su-17 FITTER
The aircraft crashed in early 1988. The parts have been collected by the US Military Liaison Mission.

Today

Usage

Closed. A part of the former area is used as glider airfield.

Links

Bibliography

  • /USMLM 1988/:
    United States Military Liaison Mission: "Unit History 1988"
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